bovine:GREATEST ASSET

 

It’s all about the horns, right?  

What most don’t know is female cows can have horns, especially in dairy breads. What deems them as a cow instead of a steer or bull is the ability to have a calf. I chose to use horns as the bovine’s greatest physical feature because it was genetic and not gender.  That and horns hold a certain cash value. That price makes them an asset. Milk and meat are also assets, but udders belong to cows, and steers aren’t typically used for meat either.  It brings us back to the horns and their gender neutrality. 

So all that was the beginning, but while painting I became reflective on beauty. Who doesn’t want to be deemed as beautiful inside and out? In the grand scheme, I think it is easier to change one’s internal rather than external.  You can work on becoming patient whenever, but you can’t turn back time for that youthful skin, no matter how much cosmetic work you get. So, some hold onto what they think or have been told is their best feature. They accentuate it.  An attribute to classical portraiture is highlighting what the subjects are proud of and /or want to been seen as. I’d like to think my cows are proud that they are genetically capable of growing horns and would choose to pose this way.

Red Horns
Red Horns

oil on canvas 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) 2013 unavailable

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Blue Horns
Blue Horns

oil on canvas 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) 2013 unavailable

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Hipster Horns
Hipster Horns

oil on canvas 30 x 24 in. (76.2 x 61 cm) 2013 unavailable

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Red Horns
Red Horns

oil on canvas 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) 2013 unavailable

press to zoom